Using Psychology to Sell Tickets

How often are you “thinking like a customer” when considering your marketing and sales strategies? As you probably know, getting into your audiences’ heads can help boost sales, but it’s not always easy to know how to do it.

To help, HubSpot Blogs has put together 10 psychological ideas that you can utilize when developing your marketing and sales plans. Click here for the full list, or check out a few of our favorites below:

Reciprocity

Introduced in Dr. Robert Cialdini’s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, the concept of “reciprocity” is simple — if someone does something for you, you naturally will want to do something for them. 

If you’ve ever gotten a mint with your bill at a restaurant, you’ve been the victim of reciprocity. According to Cialdini, when servers bring a check to their patrons without a mint, the diners will tip according to their perceptions of the service given. With one mint, the tip jumps up 3.3%. Two mints? The tip jumps “through the roof” to roughly 20%. 

In your marketing, there are a lot of ways to take advantage of reciprocity. You don’t have to be rolling in dough to give something away; it can be anything from a branded sweatshirt, to an exclusive ebook, to a free desktop background, to your expertise on a difficult subject matter. Even something as simple as a handwritten note can go a long way in establishing reciprocity. Just be sure you’re giving away the free thing before you ask for something in return. 

Social Proof

Most marketers are aware of this concept already, but it was too important to leave out from this list. If you’re not familiar with it, social proof is the theory that people will adopt the beliefs or actions of a group of people they like or trust. In other words, it’s the “me too” effect. Think of this like an awkward middle school dance — few people want to be the first one on the dance floor, but once a few people are there, everyone else wants to join in. (Keep in mind, this desire to conform doesn’t go away when you get older and less bashful about your dance moves.)

One easy way to make the most of social proof is on your blog. If you’re not already, use social sharing and follow buttons that display the number of followers your accounts have or the number of shares a piece of content has. If those numbers are front and center and you already have a few people sharing your post, people who stumble on your post later will be much more likely to share.

The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon

Ever heard about a product and then start seeing it everywhere you look? You can thank The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon. It starts happening after you encounter something for the first time, and then you start noticing it cropping up in everyday life. Suddenly you see ads for the product every time you watch TV. And when you go to the grocery store, you happen to walk down the aisle and spot it. And alllllll of your friends have the product. 

It’s weird right? Here’s why you’re suddenly seeing this new thing everywhere.

According to PS Mag, this phenomenon (also called “the frequency illusion”) is caused by two processes. “The first, selective attention, kicks in when you’re struck by a new word, thing, or idea; after that, you unconsciously keep an eye out for it, and as a result find it surprisingly often. The second process, confirmation bias, reassures you that each sighting is further proof of your impression that the thing has gained overnight omnipresence.”

For marketers, this phenomenon is precisely why nurturing is incredibly important. Once someone starts noticing your brand (aka clicking around on your website), you’ll want to help them start seeing you “everywhere.” Send them targeted nurturing emails and retargeting ads based on their behavior, and you could increase the possibility of them converting.

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