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Pricing

Variable Pricing Is a No-Brainer

With the Super Bowl yesterday, we’re reminded of how the NFL is a juggernaut, culturally and commercially. Half the country watched the game, including tens of millions of people who don’t even like football! This kind of power has a few funny effects, of course, and I think one of them has been a certain amount of arrogance about ticket sales. The NFL has, for a number of years, been such a ticket sales sure thing that even slight weaknesses …

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Pricing

Consumers Getting Wise to Primary-Secondary Market Shenanigans

A man in New Jersey who bought some pretty expensive tickets to the Super Bowl is suing the NFL for not releasing more tickets to be sold to the general public. His claim is that, according to New Jersey law, at least five percent of tickets must be available for regular people to buy. I don’t know anything about the merits of his case, but it shows that consumers are getting savvy to the idea that the primary market sellers …

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Experience

Ready for a Cold Weather Super Bowl?

Read up about how MetLife Stadium in New Jersey is getting ready for this year’s Super Bowl. Every few years, the NFL skips the balmy climates of places like Miami, Tampa, New Orleans and San Diego to hold a Super Bowl somewhere potentially chilly. This game, however, is the first Super Bowl in a cold winter climate and an outdoor stadium.* Indianapolis, Detroit and Minneapolis have all hosted, but their stadiums are all climate-controlled domes. MetLife is a great big …

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Experience

No Tug of War Between Live and Broadcast

I’ve noticed a number of writers and observers falling prey to the understandable but wrong fallacy of seeing live and broadcast versions of the same event as competitive to each other. Most recently, Miami Attorney and sports blogger Darren Heitner pitches the relationship between live and broadcast sports as “the biggest rivalry of 2014.” He sees a tug of war between the watching of sports on TV and attending it in person. On the surface, it makes sense, in that …

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News

Chill on Playoff Blackouts

Bees found their way into the bonnets of a whole bunch of sportswriters over the last couple of days as the prospect of local blackouts on the broadcasts of three of the four NFL playoff games this weekend was narrowly avoided. First, let’s review the Blackout Rule (which I discussed recently here). It says that if the tickets to an NFL game are not sold out by 72 hours from kickoff, the broadcast will be blacked out in the local …

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Half-Bakery

The NFL Gets It Backward

It started as a bad idea and, over the course of a generation, it didn’t age well. I’m talking about the Federal Communications Commission’s Blackout Rule, which was implemented in 1973 for the National Football League. It says a lot of things, but to sum them up if a team doesn’t sell out its stadium by 72 hours from game time, broadcasters in the local market can’t see the game. Why? To improve ticket sales, of course. I could be …

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Experience

NFL Has a Problem With In-Stadium Experience

I’ve said this before and time has only made it clearer that I was right: The NFL has a problem with the in-stadium experience. The ingenuity shown by the Seahawks in using undercover security who will be dressed as opposing team fans is great. But it shouldn’t be necessary. Clean up the in-stadium experience, or game attendance will slowly trend down, as it has in the three years since I first warned about this. Take a look at the Los …

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