#MondayMotivation: The turtle at the Bottom of the Pile

Looking for a little #MondayMotivation? We’re pulling out past stories that are still just as relevant today. Here’s a pearl from Jim: Full Buildings Drive Everything.

“Driving,” © 2014 Chad Cooper, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Success carries within it the seed of failure. The things that make something strong also make it vulnerable to future decline.

The sports industry has a problem, and I feel obligated to point it out. Just as a few years ago, I identified some problems that the NFL was about to experience. I see structural problems for all major sports developing.

On the one hand, things have never been better. The money and attention have never been greater. The NBA is about to sign a new television rights deal that’s going to bring in an extra billion dollars a year for, essentially, the same thing as it’s selling today for much less money. There are more TV channels and more coverage and more ways to “monetize” a player’s “brand.” In fact, when I spend time around sports people, that’s what I hear the most: excitement about TV and sponsorships. No wonder. That’s the easy money. It’s glamorous and fun to figure out which beverage brand to get Kevin Durant to sponsor.

Go to a sports conference sometime though and watch what happens to the audience during a panel about the live experience. The panel could be about selling tickets on the in-stadium experience. What I have seen recently is that it gets a lot easier to get a seat right at the front, even if big-time names are on the stage.

My first reaction to seeing this was to say that nobody cares about the in-person experience. It’s old-fashioned. It’s easier to stay home and watch it on TV. The revenue from TV is bigger. Yes, of course, all those things are true. But then it occurred to me: If no one cared, why are organizations spending so much money on it? Why put $1.3 billion (yes more than the TV windfall for the NBA) into a building if no one cares, and it no longer matters? If it’s unimportant, why rebuild an entire downtown area in a major metropolitan area just to support it?

Check out the rest of Jim’s post: Full Buildings Drive Everything.

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