How to Really Listen to Your Customers

Photo Credit: © 2006 Jonathan Powell, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Photo Credit: © 2006 Jonathan Powell, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

How often do you collect audience feedback? And more important, how are you collecting that feedback?

While Jim has talked before about embracing customer reviews and feedback (read more about that here), it can still be a challenge to implement a system of gathering that feedback in a constructive and consistent way.

To help, check out these tips on Harvard Business Review from Ana Brant. Brant is the director of global guest experience and innovation for the Dorchester Collection of hotels. While her experience is in the hospitality industry, there’s plenty we can apply to live entertainment. See the full article here or a few of our favorite tips below:

On Mystery Shoppers: 

“A mystery shopper’s report is an important tool to help us deliver efficient service. But it’s equally important for my team to remember that a checklist, which tends to reward repetitive behaviors, cannot encompass everything we hope to be.”

On Review Sites: 

“… [R]eview sites highlight our blind spots. And when customer reviews include images, they show our products and services through our customers’ eyes, not how professional photographers pose and light them for our website. This can be a reality check for us.

They can also help you look into your competition’s customer experience. Ask this key question: What do you have that customers love — and your competitors lack?”

A hotel guest bragging about her stay on Instagram.

A hotel guest bragging about her stay on Instagram.

On Social Media: 

“Social media is best for discovering what customers really value about their luxury experience with you. This information shapes customer experience strategy. Of course, they can also provide early warning signals that service has slipped. If your social media posts read like comment cards, that’s an alarm bell.”

On Observing Firsthand: 

“One of the most powerful and often underappreciated tools for improving service and performance is direct observation. Sit in the lobby and see how staff members greet guests, how traffic flows through registration, and how well people work together.”

Read More:

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