Easy Ways to Make Fans Love Your Website

It’s common knowledge these days that audiences are using your website to learn more about shows and purchase tickets. So doesn’t it make sense to make that experience as easy as possible?

Entrepreneur.com recently pointed out nine often overlooked ways to make visitors love your website. You can read the full list here, and check out our top picks below:

Photo credit: Anna Demianenko via Unsplash

Photo credit: Anna Demianenko via Unsplash

“1. Make it fast.

A modern website needs to be designed for the modern browsers. Not only does a cleaner site create a better user experience, it also improves its functionality. One of the most important things to constantly monitor is the speed of your site. Did you know that 40 percent of people abandon a website that takes more than three seconds to load?

It’s hard to resist installing all the coolest software, and making some money displaying ads, but these things slow down your site. Your site speed might really suffer, and you’ll lose your readers along with it.

2. Make it legible.

Select a font that will complement your overall imagery and that will be easy to read. Please don’t use Comic Sans or Times New Roman. While there is nothing wrong with those fonts, they don’t convey an image of a polished, well-defined brand.

3. Make it easy on the eyes.

Just because you’ve got so much space on a screen, doesn’t mean you have to use it all. Nicely space out text and images, and employ the power of white space. It makes reading easier and creates an overall pleasurable experience; whereas websites that are too crowded create a sense of information being crammed onto website and pushed onto readers.

4. Make it clear.

When people visit your website for the first time, make sure you screen them out with a clear mission or even a slogan right up front. This way, only people, who are looking for the types of information you provide, will stick.

One way to see if you’re doing a good job at attracting the right kinds of readers is to look at entry rates, exit rates and bounce rates for individual pages.

If a page has a high number of entries, but 80 percent of that traffic is bouncing, there is clearly an issue with the page.”

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