Customer Service Saves Lives (Literally)

Not all customer service saves lives. But good customer service can certainly boost business.

Inc. shares an example of a customer service call that just may have saved actual lives: a Barrett .50 caliber M-107 machine gun malfunctioned on the battlefield in Afghanistan during a live firefight, and a Marine called customer service. Don Cook, a Marine Corps veteran, answered the phone. The problem was solved in 30 to 45 seconds, and the Marines rejoined the battle.

“An usher at the Center,” © 2005 Chicago’s North Shore Conventions & Visitors Burea, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Not all customer service calls have lives depending on them — but the Inc. example proves the importance of good customer service. The Inc. reporter writes:

“To put it simply, failing on the customer service front will cost you customers. And not just the ones that have a poor experience, but potentially everyone they talk to as well.

But excelling at customer service leads to many rewards. It can serve as a differentiator between you and your competitors, generate positive word-of-mouth (including on social media, a potent marketing tool), and lead to new and repeat business.”

• An American Express Survey found that people are will to spend 14 percent more for great customer service and nearly half of the respondents (46 percent) said they’d share details about their good experiences with others, telling an average of eight other people.

• A Zendesk survey supports those results, discovering that 40 percent of people start purchasing from a competitor because of that company’s positive customer service reputation. Additionally, 55 percent of people are willing to make recommendations to others based on customer service experience, even more than those based on the product or price.

The Zendesk survey showed that a stunning 85 percent of respondents were willing to pay up to 25 percent more if exceptional customer service was part of the deal. And 82 percent of people have abandoned a company because of a bad customer service-related experience.”

Read more from Jim about customer service:



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